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Boston Tutor Charles Robinson, Ph.D.
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  Tutor Advantage.com   >    Boston High School Enrichment Tutor

Boston High School Enrichment Tutoring

As a professional enrichment tutor, I have helped numerous high school students in the Boston area.

Sally

Consider "Sally", a high school student who is taking honors math and getting 100's on quizzes and tests.  It might not occur to Sally to think, "I need a math tutor."

It might not occur to Mom and Dad to think, "Sally needs a math tutor." I would suggest that Sally needs a math tutor.  Without tutoring, Sally is limited by what her school's math department is able to provide her with.

With my help, Sally can go well beyond what the school is providing.  The knowledge, skills , and advancement she attains in high school will stand her in good stead during the rest of her educational career.

Abby

Abby is a high school sophomore whom I tutored from the time she was in seventh grade until she was a senior in high school.  We pursued 5 tracks, in parallel:

  • Develop vocabulary for the verbal SAT.
  • Train for the 800 in the math SAT.
  • Provide additional depth for her honors math course.
  • Learn calculus.
  • Read a certain advanced math book, recommended by another of Abby's mentors, which turns out to be both fascinating and accessible.

Enrichment Tutor Benefits

Here are some of the benefits of this program.

  • The smartest person in Abby's math class is a girl, and it is Abby.  (See Courtney on the subject of math and girls.)
  • She is on track in her SAT training for a 700 in verbal and 800 in math.
  • Like many high school students, Abby is considering a career in science or engineering, but won't admit it.  High school students who have this desire usually keep it to themselves, because they are concerned with the question, "Am I smart enough?"  In Abby's case, when the time comes to decide, her answer will be, "Yes."
  • Whatever college major and career Abby chooses, her intellect will be highly developed.  As we like to say, Question: What is the downside to fitness?  Answer: There is none.
  • Higher mathematics, for example subjects like calculus, requires the student to develop what is called "mathematical maturity."  By the time Abby gets to college, she will have a several years had start in developing that quality.
  • In the course of learning to excel during these crucial years of middle school and high school, Abby has strikingly evolved from a shy and unsure person to a still reserved but very self-confident person.

What is the downside of excellence?

We asked, "What is the downside of fitness?"  (There is none.)  Now we ask, "What is the downside of excellence?"  The answer is still, "There is none."

What can a parent do to help their gifted child?

Consider your high school child who is doing well in math (and physics and chemistry).  She or he should not be limited to what the high school can provide.  Call (617-232-5920) or write (doctorcharles@verizon.net) to arrange a one-on-one program of enrichment for your child.

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